The Context of Our Discipline

The Context of Our Discipline

No one can focus on every discipline at once. I love to talk about disciplines; I’m passionate about it, but it relies on context. Within nutrition, there are times for disciplines that help one lose weight and there are times for disciplines that help one gain weight; the same is true with both psychological and spiritual disciplines!

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Brain Drain

Brain Drain

Doctor Showbizhair:

You are on the Ethernet air with Doctor Showbizhair. Last week JC and I had a cool little conversation on an excellent book called Grain Brain, by David Perlmutter, MD. Now we only had twenty minutes to talk about stuff and we got a little side tracked on a fascinating subject. But since this is about Grain Brain I suppose it should be limited to discussion. Continue reading “Brain Drain”

The Story of the Mining Town

The Story of the Mining Town

The whistle blows and everyone in the factory gets to go home in Baxter Springs, Kansas. Three of said workers at this steel factor were young boys from the near-by town of Greans. These boys were well on their way into manhood, but they had not seen much of the world outside these two towns and they still loved to play. So, on the way home, they stopped to explore the caves some – as many young men would.

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On continuing education

On continuing education

I have an old roommate from college; we just got back in contact after a few years of us doing our own thing. Every time we talk, he says something to the effect of, “You’ve been in school the whole time I’ve known you.” The sad part? He’s right. I’ve been an adult for 16 years. For eleven of those, I’ve been in school one way or another. And I’m going back for more. Continue reading “On continuing education”

On being Southern 

On being Southern 

I am southern, and I am from the country. Our (mobile) home was surrounded on 3 sides by farmland and the other was a swamp. Everything was 20 minutes away, except for the corner store my grandpa’s brother ran. Blue jeans and boots and flannel shirts weren’t a grunge fashion trend for us, it was work clothes. My neck has been red from working in the hot sun all day.

  • I’ve worked in fields, picking beans, checking watermelons, squash, zucchini, and cucumbers.
  • I grew up on Johnny Cash, both Hank Williams (Hank III notwithstanding), Garth Brooks, Alan Jackson, and all the country music.
  • As a kid (and maybe still as an adult), I have watched professional wrestling in just my underpants, sweating into the couch and cheering for Ric Flair.
  • I have cursed General William Tecumseh Sherman for burning our beautiful homeland.
  • I devoured Mark Twain’s colorful stories of life that hasn’t changed much in the 125 years or so since he wrote.
  • I have celebrated my southern heritage my entire life. I thought I knew all about my culture and what that entailed, from tailgating (I’ve even done so at church after service) to cooking barbecue to bow ties and khaki shorts and red Solo cups.

That is,until a couple of weeks ago. A colleague of mine posted an article quoting Flannery O’Connor. In addition to confirming my fears and suspicions about ministry in the South, it also opened my eyes to a part of my culture that I had neglected: diversity in literature.

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Judge, Jury, & Executioner

Judge, Jury, & Executioner

People always have questions about whether or not they can judge others, or whether or not others can judge them. Too often do I hear stuff like “Jesus said, ‘judge not lest ye be judged,’ so you can’t judge me!” or “You can’t tell me what to do! Your Bible says that you aren’t supposed to judge me!” or from other believers I might hear, “I know I’m not supposed to judge but can’t I at least speak up against….” The truth is that we all make judgments about everything we come in contact with and that’s perfectly fine.

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wasted.

wasted.

 

Whenever someone prefaces a conversation with “I was playing video games for like 8 hours this Saturday,” or “I binged watched the whole first season of (insert favorite show here) on Netflix last night,” I normally ask them one thing.

Do you know what opportunity cost is?

Continue reading “wasted.”